5 Careers in the Pharmaceutical Industry

There are a number of jobs in the pharmaceutical industry that can offer you a unique experience in healthcare outside of the typical hospital setting.

Sales Representative

This is probably one of the first jobs that will come to mind when people hear the word “pharmaceuticals”. The job will require you to sell an organization’s product, build relationships with clients, maintain records, and have in-depth knowledge of the company’s product.

According to PayScale, the average salary for a pharmaceutical sales representative is $66,814 per year, with a reported salary range of $50,463 to $111,499.

Search openings on Monster to find Pharmaceutical Sales Representative jobs in your area.

Research & Development Manager

If you love learning and exploring new topics, you might want to pursue research and development in the pharmaceutical industry. The job involves research, project management, personnel management, and staying on top of large amounts of data.

According to PayScale, the average salary for a research and development manager in the pharmaceutical industry is $101,163 per year, with a reported salary range of $61,165 to $156,551.

Search openings on Monster to find Pharmaceutical Research and Development Manager jobs in your area.

Project Manager

The role of a project manager can mean something different for every industry, but in the world of pharmaceuticals, it’s the person who is in charge of overseeing the development of new medical equipment and medicines. They work closely with engineers, doctors, and clinical researchers to ensure that everyone stays on budget and that the final product is delivered on time.

According to PayScale, the average salary for a project manager in the pharmaceutical industry is $84,268 per year, with a reported salary range of $54,664 to $138,451.

Search openings on Monster to find Pharmaceutical Project Manager jobs in your area.

Quality Manager

The pharmaceutical industry involves close attention to detail since the final product is generally related to the public’s overall well being. Therefore, a quality manager is another great role in pharmaceuticals for anyone who enjoys investigating and resolving issues and ensuring products are up to standards. The role requires managing records, delivering reports, implementing safety procedures for testing, and ensuring products meet the highest standards possible.

According to PayScale, the average salary for a quality manager in the pharmaceutical industry is $83,766 per year, with a reported salary range of $59,323 to $126,849.

Search openings on Monster to find Pharmaceutical Quality Manager jobs in your area.

Laboratory Analyst

A laboratory analyst is responsible for testing the chemical or physical makeup of new products and samples to ensure they are accurate. If the product isn’t correct, they must evaluate the sample to determine what errors were made. It’s a role that also requires a strict knowledge of federal compliance regulations and standards.

According to PayScale, the average salary for a laboratory analyst in the pharmaceutical industry is $42,087 per year, with a reported salary range of $29,945 to $56,868.

Thin polymer film could revolutionize monitoring of cancer patients

A thin, stretchable polymer-based film that can coil light waves like a Slinky could make monitoring of cancer survivors more effective and less expensive. Developed by the University of Michigan chemical engineering researchers, the film provides a simpler, more cost-effective way to produce circularly polarized light, part of a process that could eventually provide an early warning of cancer recurrence. The research is detailed in a paper published online in Nature Materials.

Circular polarization is similar to the linear version that’s common in things like polarized sunglasses. But instead of polarizing light in a two-dimensional wave, circular polarization coils it into a three-dimensional helix shape that can spin in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

Circular polarization is invisible to the naked eye, and it’s rare in nature. That makes it useful in an up-and-coming cancer detection process that looks to be able to spot telltale signs of the disease in the blood. Currently, in the research stage, the process requires large, expensive machines to generate the circularly polarized light. Nicholas Kotov, the Joseph B. and Florence V. Cejka Professor of Engineering leading the research and an author of the paper, believes the new film could provide a simpler, less expensive way to induce polarization.